Sparks Electrical News

By Hannes Baard

And so without fanfare or a drum roll, the end of another year crept up on most of us. With so much happening around us what with money that is not really money, weather extremes, spectacular business growth on the one hand and just as spectacular business disasters on the other… We will ignore all that if we can for a few minutes and carry on from where we left off last time.

Previously we looked at the breakdown of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (Act 85 of 1993) and the various groups of Regulations stemming from that Act.

The first group of Regulations we looked at in broad strokes was the so called “General Regulations”. In this group we find the Environmental Regulations for Workplaces, 1987, the Facilities Regulations, 1990, the General Administrative Regulations, 2003 and the General Health and Safety Regulations, 1986.

The next group we will take a look at is the so called “Health related regulations”.

The Health related regulations group consists of:

Asbestos Regulations, 2001

1. Definitions
2. Scope of application
These Regulations shall apply to every employer and self-employed person who carries out work at a workplace that may expose any person to asbestos dust at that workplace
3. Notification of asbestos work
4. Exposure to asbestos
5. Information and training
6. Duties of persons who may be exposed
7. Assessment of potential exposure
8. Air monitoring
9. Medical surveillance
10. Respirator zone
11. Control of exposure to asbestos
12. Cleanliness of premises and plant
13. Control of exposure to asbestos of persons other than employees
14. Asbestos that forms part of structure of workplace, building, plant or premises
15. Asbestos cement sheeting and related products
16. Records
17. Personal protective equipment and facilities
18. Maintenance of control measures
19. Labeling, packaging, transportation and storage
20. Disposal of asbestos
21. Demolition
22. Prohibition
23. Offences and penalties
24. Repeal of regulations
25. Short title

Next we get the Hazardous Biological Agent Regulations, 2001

1. Definitions
2. Scope of application
(1) These regulations shall apply to every employer and self-employed person at a workplace where:
   a) HBA is deliberately produced, processed, used, handled, stored or transported; or
   b) an incident, for which an indicative list is given in Annexure A to this Regulation occurs that does not involve a deliberate intention to work with a HBA but may result in persons being exposed to HBA in the performance of his or her work.
(2) Regulations 8, 14, 15, 16 and 17 shall not apply to an employer or self-employed person at a workplace where the exposure is restricted to a Group I HBA.
3. Classification of biological agents
4. Information and training
5. Duties of persons who might be exposed to HBA
6. Risk assessment by employer or self-employed person
7. Monitoring exposure at workplace
8. Medical surveillance
9. Records
10. Control of exposure to HBA
11. Personal protective equipment and facilities
12. Maintenance of control measures, equipment and facilities
13. Prohibitions
14. Labelling, packaging, transporting and storage
15. Special measures for health and veterinary isolation facilities
16. Special measures for laboratories, animal rooms and industrial processes
17. Disposal of HBA
18. Offences and penalties
19. Short title
Annexure A: Indicative list of incidents
Annexure B: Hazardous biological agents guidelines
Annexure C: Precautions for workplaces
Annexure D: Precautions
Annexure E: Indications concerning containment measures and containment levels
Annexure F: Containment for industrial processes

We now move on to the Hazardous Chemical Substances Regulations, 1995

1. Definitions
2. Scope of application
(1) Subject to the provisions of sub-regulation (2), these regulations shall apply to an employer or a self-employed person who carries out work at a workplace which may expose any person to the intake of an HCS at the workplace.
(2) The provisions of regulations 3(1), 6 and 7 shall not apply to:
(a) a self-employed person; or
(b) a person who visits a workplace as contemplated in subregulation (1).
(3) The provisions of these regulations shall not apply in the case where the Lead Regulations and Asbestos Regulations apply.
3. Information and training
4. Duties of persons who may be exposed to hazardous chemical substances
5. Assessment of potential exposure
6. Air monitoring
7. Medical surveillance
8. Respirator zone
9. Records
9A. Handling of hazardous chemical substances
10. Control of exposure to HCS
11. Personal protective equipment and facilities
12. Maintenance of control measures
13. Prohibitions
14. Labelling, packaging, transportation and storage
15. Disposal of hazardous chemical substances
16. Offences and Penalties
17. Short title
Annexure 1: Hazardous chemical substances guidelines
Annexure 2: Calculation of exposure with regard to the specified reference periods
Annexure 3: Methods of measurement and calculation for determining fibre concentrations of manmade mineral fibre
Annexure 4: Cotton Dust
Annexure 5: Asphyxiants
Annexure 6: Rubber fume and rubber process dust
Annexure 7: The definition of Grain Dust
Annexure 8: Material safety data sheet

Next we get the Lead Regulations, 2001

1. Definitions
2. Scope of application
(1) Subject to subregulation (2), these regulations shall apply to every employer and self-employed person at a workplace where lead is produced, processed, used, handled or stored in a form in which it can be inhaled, ingested or absorbed by any person in that workplace.
(2) Regulations 4(1), 4(2), 4(3), 4(4), 4(6), 6(2), 7, 8, 10(c), 10(d), 10(f), 11(2)(f) and 12(6) shall not apply in the case of self-employed persons.
3. Exposure to airborne lead
4. Information and training
5. Duties of persons who may be exposed
6. Assessment of potential exposure
7. Air monitoring
8. Medical surveillance
9. Respirator zone
10. Records
11. Control of exposure to lead
12. Personal protective equipment and facilities
13. Cleanliness of premises and plant
14. Maintenance of control measures
15. Prohibitions
16. Labelling, packaging, transportation and storage
17. Disposal of lead waste
18. Offences and penalties
19. Repeal of regulations
20. Short title
Annexure A to D: Blood and Urinary Lead Levels

And finally in this group the Noise Induced Hearing Loss Regulations, 2003

1. Definitions
2. Scope of application
These regulations shall apply to an employer or self-employed person who, at any workplace under his or her control, carries out work that may expose any person at that workplace to noise at or above the noise-rating limit.
3. Exposure to noise
4. Information and training
5. Duties of persons who may be exposed to noise
6. Assessment of potential noise exposure
7. Noise monitoring
8. Medical surveillance
9. Noise zone
10. Control of noise exposure
11. Record
12. Hearing protective equipment
13. Maintenance of control measures
14. Offences and penalties
15. Withdrawal of regulations

I trust you have learned something. The intention was not at this time to go into detail, but rather look at the section headings to get the overall picture of the Regulations. And quite frankly, just reading the section titles of the biological and chemical Regulations gives rise to thoughts of a very scary science fiction movie storyline... These summaries will come in handy at some point, trust me…

Till next time…

BANNER 2

Contact Sparks Electrical News

Title: Editor
Name: Gregg Cocking
Email: sparks@crown.co.za
Phone: +27 11 622-4770
Fax: +27 11 615-6108

Title: Advertising Manager
Name: Carin Hannay
Email: carinh@crown.co.za
Phone: +27 11 622-4770
Fax: +27 11 615-6108

 
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